Volume 4, Issue 1 & 2, 2007

Cover page | Editorial | Content | Contributors
 

Articles

  1. B. Venkatacharya’s Novels in the Kannada Literary Polysystem and the Founding of the Novel in Kannada.
Author(s): S. Jayasrinivasa Rao     Pages: 1-26       Published: 2007
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B. Venkatacharya’s Novels in the Kannada Literary Polysystem and the Founding of the Novel in Kannada
S. JAYASRINIVASA RAO
Abstract
This paper looks at the dynamics of the appropriation and establishment of the novel as an independent genre in Kannada literature through translations during the last decades of the 19th and the early decades of the 20th Century. With Itamar Even-Zohar’s concept of ‘literary system as a polysystem’, as the theoretical anchor, the corpus of translated novels of B. Venkatacharya is looked at as a unified genre. Through this perspective, the role played by B. Venkatacharya’s Kannada translations of Bengali novels in establishing the novel in Kannada literature is examined.
Keywords: Translation, Tribal folktales, Oriya language, Communities, Cultural practices
Cite this work
Rao, S. Jayasrinivasa. 2007. B. Venkatacharya’s Novels in the Kannada Literary Polysystem and the Founding of the Novel in Kannada. Translation Today, vol. 4 (1&2). 1-26
  2. Translatology: Interrogative Musings on the Grid.
Author(s): P.P. Giridhar     Pages: 27-50       Published: 2007
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Translatology: Interrogative Musings on the Grid
P.P. GIRIDHAR
Abstract
This essay attempts some regurgitation of what has been happening in TS these days. It argues that Translatology has culpably failed to address issues and has instead moved around without quite getting things into a rational perspective. It argues that the putative opposition of the ‘linguistic turn’ and the ‘cultural turn’ in TS is misplaced, by spotlighting the language-nonlanguage dialectic (Rajendra Singh (2005) argues for a ‘re-turn’). Translatology has culpably failed to work toward the rigour that characterizes, or should characterize, all academic disciplines. This piece is a plea for more rigour and less hyperactivity in TS. That there is as yet no theory of translation is unarguable. None is there to be sighted on the horizon. I don’t agree with Peter Newmark on the other hand that there can be no laws or theory of translation. That is too strong a position to take it seems to me. (Equally obvious is the averral that there is no theory of literature. ‘Theory’ is too strong a word to characterise the phenomenon of literature) Whatever TS theory may be said to exist lacks muscle tone in a way in which Nuclear Physics, for example, does not. That Nuclear Physics is a physical or natural science and TS is Humanities is no argument. The point is that anything that is unconstrained in an absolute sense, in a transcendent sense cannot be piquant in any meaningful sense. Unbridled or barely bridled creativity cannot be meaning-making. Absolutely untrammeled centrifugality where everything and anything ‘goes’ is in point of fact an intellectually vacuous exercise. The ‘cultural turn’ in its strong version effects a radical change in the ‘enabling function’ of translation and converts the ‘traces’ of the translator’s presence into a massively visible one. At the least the ‘cultural turn’ is misstated and, in a sense, which I hope to make clear, overstated in the sense of throwing the floodgates open, which isn’t a hallmark of an academic discipline. Attempting an elucidation of why things are the way they are in TS the note concludes that TS must strive toward a crosslinguistically and crossculturally valid discourse about translation, a discourse grounded in, sanctioned by, driven and underpinned by a well-founded, crossculturally valid but subject-to-rational-change grid. This piece is intended therefore as a corrector and some kind of a reiner. As indicated at places what is said about translation applies equally to literature. The piece would have served its purpose if the interrogatives get home. The answers could take a while to come by.
Keywords: Translatology, Translator, Discourse, Cultural turn, Scientific translations
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Giridhar, P.P. 2007. Translatology: Interrogative Musings on the Grid. Translation Today, vol. 4 (1&2). 27-50
  3. Not Lost in Translation:Chemmeen on Alien Shores.
Author(s): Mini Chandran     Pages: 51-62       Published: 2007
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Not Lost in Translation:Chemmeen on Alien Shores
MINI CHANDRAN
Abstract
The process of translation as it is generally understood often implies loss of subtle linguistic nuances and cultural flavour in the target language. Are there components that survive translation and appeal to ‘other’ cultures and languages? This paper attempts to answer this question by foregrounding the Malayalam writer Thakazhi Sivasankara Pillai’s Chemmeen, which is one of the most translated works in Malayalam. The success of Chemmeen in translation is a surprise, given the fact that it is about a very specific culture, which is of the fisher folk in the coastal region of Alappuzha and that it is written in an almost untranslatable colloquial Malayalam. Obviously there are factors that have surmounted the obstacles of language and cultural difference. The paper focuses on the components that survive the process of translation, like the structural simplicity of the story that can be reduced to an archetype or the elements of folklore that resonate even on culturally alien shores.
Keywords: Translation, Chemmeen, Original language, Culture, Community
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Chandran, Mini. 2007. Not Lost in Translation:Chemmeen on Alien Shores. Translation Today, vol. 4 (1&2). 51-62
  4. Translating Ulysses into Malayalam:Theorising a Practice. br />
Author(s): Chitra Panikkar     Pages: 63-73       Published: 2007
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Translating Ulysses into Malayalam:Theorising a Practice
CHITRA PANIKKAR
Abstract
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Panikkar, Chitra. 2007. Translating Ulysses into Malayalam:Theorising a Practice. Translation Today, vol. 4 (1&2). 63-73
  5. Translating Violence: Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz’s La Respuesta Respuest a11.
Author(s): Ira Sahasrabudhe     Pages: 74-87       Published: 2007
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Translating Violence: Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz’s La Respuesta Respuest a11
IRA SAHASRABUDHE
Abstract
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Sahasrabudhe, Ira. 2007. Translating Violence: Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz’s La Respuesta Respuest a11. Translation Today, vol. 4 (1&2). 74-87
  6. Translation as Empowerment :Translational Fiction of Latin America.
Author(s): Sonya S. Gupta     Pages: 88-100       Published: 2007
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Translation as Empowerment :Translational Fiction of Latin America
SONYA S. GUPTA
Abstract
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Gupta, Sonya S. 2007. Translation as Empowerment :Translational Fiction of Latin America. Translation Today, vol. 4 (1&2). 88-100
  7. Writing and Translation:Perspectives from Latin America.
Author(s): T. Srivani     Pages: 101-112       Published: 2008
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Writing and Translation:Perspectives from Latin America
T. SRIVANI
Abstract
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Srivani, T. 2007. Writing and Translation:Perspectives from Latin America. Translation Today, vol. 4 (1&2). 101-112
  8. Redefining the Karna Parampara Katha via Intralingual Translation.
Author(s): Sujatha Vijayaraghavan     Pages: 113-133       Published: 2007
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Redefining the Karna Parampara Katha via Intralingual Translation
SUJATHA VIJAYARAGHAVAN
Abstract
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Vijayaraghavan, Sujatha. 2007. Redefining the Karna Parampara Katha via Intralingual Translation. Translation Today, vol. 4 (1&2). 113-133
  9. Remapping Stylistic Boundaries:Translating Early Oriya Women’s Literature.
Author(s): Sachidananda Mohanty     Pages: 134-146       Published: 2007
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Remapping Stylistic Boundaries:Translating Early Oriya Women’s Literature
SACHIDANANDA MOHANTY
Abstract
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Mohanty, Sachidananda. 2007. Remapping Stylistic Boundaries:Translating Early Oriya Women’s Literature. Translation Today, vol. 4 (1&2). 134-146
  10. Situating Post Colonial Translations/Translator in India.
Author(s): T. Sarada     Pages: 147-157       Published: 2007
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Situating Post Colonial Translations/Translator in India
T. SARADA
Abstract
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Sarada, T. 2007. Situating Post Colonial Translations/Translator in India. Translation Today, vol. 4 (1&2). 147-157
  11. Bodies in Translation: Alistair Macleod’s No Great Mischief.
Author(s): B. Hariharan     Pages: 158-168       Published: 2007
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Bodies in Translation: Alistair Macleod’s No Great Mischief
B. HARIHARAN
Abstract
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Hariharan, B. 2007. Bodies in Translation: Alistair Macleod’s No Great Mischief. Translation Today, vol. 4 (1&2). 158-168
  12. Translating a Community: An Experience from Coastal Karnataka.
Author(s): Shashikantha K     Pages: 169-185       Published: 2007
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Translating a Community: An Experience from Coastal Karnataka
SHASHIKANTHA K
Abstract
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K, Shashikantha. 2007. Translating a Community: An Experience from Coastal Karnataka. Translation Today, vol. 4 (1&2). 169-185

Interviewing Translators

  1. Raji Narasimhan, (2007). TRANSLATOR’S NOTE -Translators and Translating. Translation Today. https://doi.org/10.46623/tt/2007.4.1n2.ar13

Book Review

  1. Kashyap Mankodi, (2007). Two Teats of Translation Lives in Translation: Bilingual Writers on Identity and Creativity Isabelle de Courtivron (ed.). Translation Today. https://doi.org/10.46623/tt/2007.4.1n2.br1
  2. Sushumna K, (2007). Translation review. Translation Today. https://doi.org/10.46623/tt/2007.4.1n2.br2

Book Beat

  1. Constructing a Sociology of Translation Michaela Wolf, Alexandra Fukari (eds) Translation Today. https://doi.org/10.46623/tt/2007.4.1n2.bb

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