Volume 13 Issue 2, 2019

Cover page | Editorial | Content | Contributor
 

Articles

  1. An Overview: Children’s Literature, Its Development and Translation in China.
Author(s): Min Gao     Pages: 1-15       Published: 2019
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An Overview: Children’s Literature, Its Development and Translation in China
MIN GAO
Received 11.10.2018, Accepted 24.07.2019
Abstract
Although children’s literature has long been in a peripheral position compared with adult literature across the world, it is emerging in the book market of China in the past ten years, when large amounts of children’s picture books were imported and translated every year from other languages. Interestingly, over 90% of the existing children’s picture books in the Chinese book market were translated instead of being domestically created. This article provides an overview of the children’s literature, its development and translations in China. Problems are identified concerning the translation to offer further suggestions for the translated children’s literature in China in the future[1].
Keywords: Children’s Literature, Translation, Development, Problems.
Cite this work
Gao, Min. 2019. An Overview: Children’s Literature, Its Development and Translation in China. Translation Today, Vol. 13(2). 1-15
  2. Indian Anuvad or English Translation? Combining Tradition and Modernity in the Nationalistic Translations of Nineteenth Century Bengal.
Author(s): Saswati Saha     Pages: 17-34       Published: 2019
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Indian Anuvad or English Translation? Combining Tradition and Modernity in the Nationalistic Translations of Nineteenth Century Bengal
SASWATI SAHA
Received 18.07.2018, Accepted 14.12.2019
Abstract
Translation is a space where two cultures encounter. Yet a detailed study of the translation practice prevailing in colonial Bengal and the etymology of the various words used in the Indian context to denote the practice reveals an interesting scenario where translation and its methods created a fertile but disquieting space where two cultures encountered and created a sphere in which one both abandons and assumes association. This research paper will deal mainly with the question of translation as it is conceived in the European epistemology and its effects on the indigenous understanding and practice of anuvād in the nineteenth-century Bengal. The difference between the signifier (translation) and the signified (anuvād) created as a result of the gap in the understanding of the practice in the two different cultures leads to confusion among the native translators who are caught up in the middle of two very different practices. Through a study of Vidyasagar’s translations from Sanskrit to Bengali this paper would show how the Indian panḍit strives to keep association with the indigenous practice of anuvād and yet finds it difficult to come out of the European understanding of it. This paper will focus on how combining the two practices of translation the Bengali intellectual constructed a modern identity of the Indian self that neither complied with the West, nor with the East; rather attempted to attack the binaries of the Western-Eastern, rationality-spiritualism, translation-anuvād and created a third space which could combine the two in order to give rise to a higher form of nationalism.
Keywords: Translation, Anuvād, Culture, Epistemology, Third-space.
Cite this work
Saha, Saswati.2019. Indian Anuvād or English Translation? Combining Tradition and Modernity in the Nationalistic Translations of Nineteenth Century Bengal.Translation Today, Vol.13( 2). 17-34
  3. Colonial Politics of Finding Equivalence: Interpreting ‘Translation’ and anubad through Nineteenth Century English to Sanskrit/Bengali Dictionaries.
Author(s): Rindon Kundu ORCID logo      Pages: 35-59       Published: 2019
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Colonial Politics of Finding Equivalence: Interpreting ‘Translation’ and anubad through Nineteenth Century English to Sanskrit/Bengali Dictionaries
RINDON KUNDU ORCID logo
Received 18.10.2018, Accepted 14.12.2019
Abstract
The proposed paper will be an attempt to explore the semantic domain of anubad in Bengal and how the term has been equated with ‘translation' in the nineteenth century as well as how the term also differs from the ‘standard’ English equivalents. In this paper I intend to analyze different layers of the term ‘translation’ and anubad and different understandings in the respective activities. It will also note the discrepancies and rivalries in the process of equating ‘translation’ with the practice of anubad. This paper will also seek to trace how different meanings of anubad were in common currency and formed a part of the common parlance among the Bengalis who have adjusted and fitted the term in their language in a way so that it could very well deal with both the Sanskritik and Western understanding of the act of carrying over a text from one language to another.
Keywords: Anubad, Bengal, Translation, Nineteenth Century, Equivalents.
Cite this work
Kundu, Rindon. 2019. Colonial Politics of Finding Equivalence: Interpreting ‘Translation’ and anubad through Nineteenth Century English to Sanskrit/Bengali Dictionaries. Translation Today, Vol.13( 2). 35-59.
  4. Shakespeare in Gujarati: A Translation History.
Author(s): Sunil Sagar     Pages: 61-127       Published: 2019
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Shakespeare in Gujarati: A Translation History
SUNIL SAGAR
Received 08.02.2019, Accepted 14.11.2019
Abstract
Translation history has emerged as one of the most significant enterprises within Translation Studies. Translation history in Gujarati per se is more or less an uncharted terrain. Exploring translation history pertaining to landmark authors such as Shakespeare and translation of his works into Gujarati could open up new vistas of research. It could also throw new light on the cultural and historical context and provide new insights. The paper proposes to investigate different aspects of translation history pertaining to Shakespeare’s plays into Gujarati spanning nearly 150 years.
Keywords: Translation History, Methodology, Patronage, Poetics.
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Sunil Sagar, 2019. Shakespeare in Gujarati: A Translation History. Translation Today, Vol.13(2). 61-127
  5. The Self and the Other: Some Reflections on Self-Translation.
Author(s): Irfan Ahmad Dar     Pages: 129-140       Published: 2019
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The Self and the Other: Some Reflections on Self-Translation
IRFAN AHMAD DAR
Received 30.12.2018, Accepted 14.08.2019
Abstract
Despite the research in the discipline of Translation Studies (TS) having widened very much over the last couple of decades, self-translation, its sub-field still remains bereft of the extensive and valuable research work. Self-translator is a cross-cultural interlocutor who is in the process of negotiation between languages and cultures. That is to say, self-translation invites our attention on the presence of translator and on the morphing of the self which takes place not only during the process of writing original but also at the time of translation. Therefore, the defining feature of the self-translation is that the author is the same physical person in many versions of a prototypical text. The literature in self-translation is widening very much, and the list of the self-translators is very exhaustive. In fact, there are a number of self-translators who have won great praise throughout the world and many are prestigious Nobel Laureates. This refutes and invalidates the assumption that self-translation and writing in a non-native language is an infrequent phenomenon. Hence, the creative expansion that is the result thereof can more often be seen as food for a process-oriented discourse. More importantly, when we try to understand that as a process, self-translation sets itself to deconstruct the monolithic models perpetuated erstwhile by the translation theorists. Keeping all these points in mind, the present paper is an attempt to throw some light on the problematic nature of self-translation. Furthermore, it will argue that there are still some instances wherein the concept of self-translation fails to do justice with the source text. For the author being same across the transition, the new version tends to amount more often in deviations due to the subjective factor and the assumed self-knowledge and hence, gives rise to the self- sufficiency and self- identity of the new text.
Keywords: Self, Translation Studies, Research, Original, Problematic.
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Dar, Irfan Ahmad. 2019. The Self and the Other: Some Reflections on Self-Translation. Translation Today, Vol.13(2). 129-140
  6. Panchopakhyana: Fossilized Marathi Culture and the Translation Lens.
Author(s): Priyada Sridhar Padhye     Pages: 141-175       Published: 2019
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Lessons from Translation of a Historical Novel from Tamil to English
PRIYADA SRIDHAR PADHYE
Received 30.08.2019, Accepted 14.12.2019
Abstract
This paper attempts to prove that certain translations can be described as ‘fossilized culture’ because they reveal the culture of the times in which they were produced. Such translations have certain textual elements which are a result of the historical, political, social and translatorial context in which they were produced. In order to prove this analogy, the author has identified a Marathi translation of the Pan҃chatantra called Pan҃chopa̅khya̅na. In order to understand what is meant by the words ‘fossilized culture’ in context of the translated text, a translation based textual analysis which helps in locating and situating the investigated translation in its context is undertaken. This investigation throws light on the investigated translation as well as the then prevalent activity of translation. Toury’s Descriptive Translation Studies, Itamar Even-Zohar’s Polysystem theory and Chritiane Nord’s translation based textual analysis form the theoretical base of this paper.
Keywords: Socio-translation Studies, Time-restricted Translation Theory, Marathi Translation in the Medieval Ages, Maha̅ubha̅vpanth, Pan҃chatantra.
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Padhye, Priyada Sridhar. 2019. Panchopakhyana: Fossilized Marathi Culture and the Translation Lens. Translation Today, Vol.13(2). 141-175

Book Review

  1. Ramesh M. Ingale, (2019). Working with Different Text Types in English and Arabic: Translation in Practice. Translation Today. https://doi.org/10.46623/tt/2019.13.2.br1
  2. Meenu Sabu, (2019). Moving Texts, Migrating People and Minority Language. Translation Today.
https://doi.org/10.46623/tt/2019.13.2.br2
  3. Girish N, (2019). Screening the Author: The Literary Biopic. Translation Today.
https://doi.org/10.46623/tt/2019.13.2.br3

Annotated Bibliographies

  1. Randheer Kour, (2019). An Annotated Bibliography of Translation Studies Books Published in 2018: Part II. Translation Today. https://doi.org/10.46623/tt/2019.13.2.ab1
  2. Subha Chakraburtty, (2019). An Annotated Bibliography of the Translation Studies Books Published in 2019: Part I. Translation Today. https://doi.org/10.46623/tt/2019.13.2.ab2

Translation

  Umesh Kumar ORCID logo , (2019). Gachak Andharee by Ashok Mankar & Deenu’s Bill by Prahlad Keshav Atre. Translation Today. https://doi.org/10.46623/tt/2019.13.2.tr

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